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ADVERTISERS HAVE FACEBOOK’S ATTENTION

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Facebook is about to look a little different, whether users notice or not.

A civil rights coalition that includes the Anti-Defamation League and the NAACP launched the #StopHateforProfit campaign last month, calling on major corporations to halt advertising on Facebook (FB) for the month of July due to the platform’s «repeated failure to meaningfully address the vast proliferation of hate on its platforms.» While some brands are halting spending through the end of the month, others such as household goods giant Unilever are pausing advertising through the end of the year across social media, not just Facebook.

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WHEN WORKING FROM HOME IS MUCH MORE THAN EMAILING

WHEN WORKING FROM HOME IS MUCH MORE THAN EMAILING

Since Covid-19 put the world on lockdown, a wave of new firms has rushed to adopt cloud computing. And within cloud computing a micro-industry, known as enterprise infrastructure, has bloomed.

«It’s an interesting challenge that nobody’s ever had to make a movie outside of the office. So, it’s really cool and exciting, but also terrifying because you don’t want to mess up,» says Mr Santos. So, will animated characters drawn during lockdown touch each other less?

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Cell phones as coronavirus helpline

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Junior doctor Lisa Linpower recorded her experience of lockdown for the BBC PM programme’s Covid Chronicles. The front-line worker speaks of how vital her phone has been as a tool, a companion and as a source of comfort for patients and their families.

The Covid Chronicles were launched in March when Radio 4’s PM asked its audience to write in with personal accounts of life during lockdown. Submissions will be archived in the British Library.

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The secret of iconic book covers

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A pair of eyes and red lips floating in a midnight sky above the bright lights of New York on The Great Gatsby. The half-man, half-devil on Brett Easton Ellis’s American Psycho. A single cog for an eye on A Clockwork Orange. Two orange silhouettes on David Nicholls’ One Day. The original Harry Potter colour illustrations…

A great book might stay with us for a long time but, often, its cover does too. There’s a famous saying about never forming your opinion of a book by the jacket adorning it. But most readersknow that we do, in fact, judge books by their coversall the time. Everything about a book’s cover – the font, the images, the colours – tells us something about what we can expect to find, or not, inside. A reader in the market for some bleak dystopian fiction is unlikely to have their head turned by a pastel-hued jacket with serif font.

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HOW TO WRITE EMAILS IN A PANDEMIC

HOW TO WRITE EMAILS IN A PANDEMIC

Few things have been left unaffected by Covid-19 – even email. As San Francisco-based podcast host Olivia Allen-Price wrote on Twitter: “2020: The year my e-mail sign-off went from ‘Cheers’ to ‘Hang in there’”.

Salutations once considered polite – ‘All the best’ or ‘Regards’ – can now come off as overly detached. Other more cheerful sign-offs – ‘Hope you’re having a great week!’ – seem tone-deaf. Email communication has become a balancing act: to ignore the pandemic seems disingenuous, but to overdo the platitudes about health and safety might peddle more panic.

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How cities might change if we worked from home more

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Major tech companies say they are open to their staff working from home permanently. Employees are coming to realise remote working is not only possible but, in some cases, preferable. A shift to a new way of working might already be under way.

Such a shift could have profound implications on our home life, and by extension on the life of our towns and cities: almost a quarter of all office space in England and Wales is in central London alone.

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Coronavirus: Ghana’s dancing pallbearers become Covid-19 meme

In 2017, a troupe of Ghanaian pallbearers went viral following BBC Africa’s coverage of their flamboyant coffin-carrying dances, garnering millions of views. Three years later and the group has experienced a second round of internet fame, with social media users adopting the troupe as a dark-humoured symbol of death in the time of Covid-19.

BBC Africa’s Sulley Lansah met up with the leader of the troupe to get his reaction to his new-found fame and see how he’s coping during the pandemic.

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Cutting phone time when hours with your devices are a necessity

With social distancing protocols in place amid the Covid-19 pandemic, and hours of isolation taking a toll on our sanity, screens have been a saving grace for many. Amid the crisis, views on Instagram Live doubled in one weekFacebook reported a 70% increase in Messenger group video calls and WhatsApp has seen a 40% increase in usage.

“Reaching for our phones is a common coping mechanism for the unknown,” says Doreen Dodgen-Magee, an psychologist based in the US state of Oregon and the author of Deviced! Balancing Life and Technology in a Digital World. “We stay connected to our screens and the news that they provide, hoping that it will help us feel less anxious.”

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Can English remain the ‘world’s favourite’ language?

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English is spoken by hundreds of millions of people worldwide, but do the development of translation technology and «hybrid» languages threaten its status? Which country boasts the most English speakers, or people learning to speak English?

According to a study published by Cambridge University Press, up to 350 million people in China have at least some knowledge of English – and at least another 100 million in India. There are probably more people in China who speak English as a second language than there are Americans who speak it as their first. (A fifth of Americans speak a language other than English in their own homes.)

But for how much longer will English qualify as the «world’s favourite language»?

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You are more than you think: Discover what you are made of

Our bodies are extraordinary. They contain elements that have a commercial value, megabytes of data, and trillions of cells, most of which aren’t our own. Welcome to The Making of Me and You, a unique, new digital interactive from BBC Earth that details extraordinary personalised facts and instantly find out things like: the chemical ingredients that make up you, and what your body is worth, the size and weight of your internal organs and how much wee, poo, sperm or eggs you have produced so far.

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Is heroism defined by one great act?

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Covid-19 might be a villain with global ambitions but it’s certainly not without its nemeses. The notion of the hero has become a global motif. In Thailand, artists have launched an online campaign dubbed ‘Support Our Heroes’, while in the US the Democrats have proposed a premium pay scheme for essential workers called the ‘Heroes Fund’.

Philip Zimbardo, professor emeritus of psychology at Stanford University in California says that: “heroism is the best [quality] in human nature, an ideal we can all aspire to. Lately the conception of the hero has probably become diluted – it’s being applied to, say, people who buy the groceries for their neighbour. That’s altruism. That’s being decent. But I think the current Covid crisis will throw more definitive ideas of heroism into the spotlight.”

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How to get to sleep during lockdown

How to get to sleep during lockdown

Since the coronavirus lockdown, the hashtag «can’t sleep» has been trending, with tales of people struggling to get their heads down for the night.

One of those people is Laura Coppell who declares that before the lockdown, she would sleep like a log, but now it’s the opposite. If that’s also you, here’s how you can reverse that trend. Follow these 5 steps for a week and check out the results.

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How robots have joined the battle against coronavirus

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From taking temperatures remotely to helping with hand washing, robots are helping with healthcare around the world. Thousands of devices have been interacting with contagious hospital patients in China, Japan and Korea as well as some care homes in the US.

They are practical and handy because they can all be regulated but, will they replace in any way human interaction? What about in cases like the COVID-19 as nowadays?

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Coronavirus lockdown: As Easter holidays begin, families feel strain

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We may never forget the coronavirus lockdown. But are we still going to be talking to each other at the end of it? Because apart from worries about the virus, there are likely to be rising tensions in some families having to live on top of one another at home.

In ordinary times, couples spend on average two-and-a-half hours together each day, says researcher into relationships Prof. Jacqui Gabb of the Open University. Now we can spend 15 or 16 of our waking hours together. And throw into that combustible mix, children who are out of school.

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Here’s how you can stop bad information from going viral

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You want to help family and friends and keep them in the loop. So, when you receive fresh advice – whether by email, WhatsApp, Facebook or Twitter – you might quickly forward it on to them.

Coronavirus misinformation is flooding the internet and experts are calling on the public to practise «information hygiene». What can you do to stop the spread of bad information?

Check out these seven steps before sending any information you receive to your friends and relatives. If you follow these pieces of advice, you’re already doing more than you think.

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What happens when everyday life suddenly changes?

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The lack of noise can be deafening. Quiet streets, empty public transport, bars and restaurants that have closed, self-isolating families and locked-down cities have become part of the strange days of this Covid-19 pandemic.
If the world is holding its breath to see what happens next, Codogno, a small town in Lombardy, is a microcosm of how the virus can overrun a community – and how that community can fight back.

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DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN EPIDEMIC AND A PANDEMIC

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN EPIDEMIC AND A PANDEMIC

While casual use of epidemic may not require such nuance, it’s important to know the differences between these two terms (and similar ones like outbreak and endemic) when considering public health news. In addition, from an epidemiologic standpoint, terms like these direct the public health response to better control and prevent a disease.

The role of epidemiology is to determine the disease prevalence (the proportion of people affected within a population) and incidence (the occurrence of a disease over a specific period of time) to direct the appropriate public health response.

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Can computer translators ever beat speaking a foreign tongue?

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Put crottin de chèvreinto Google Translate, and you’ll be told it means goat dung. So, if it appeared on a menu, you might pass. Alas, you would be ruling out a delicious cheese made of goat’s milk that is often served as a starter in France. Such misunderstandings are why Google admits that its free tool, used by about 500 million people, is not intended to replace human translators.

Tourists might accept a few misunderstandings because the technology is cheap and convenient. But when the stakes are higher, perhaps in business, law or medicine, these services often fall short.

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Why English people say sorry so often

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The British pride themselves on their polite manners, from maintaining a stiff upper lip to obeying precise social etiquette for every occasion. And if there is one word which trips off the English tongue more than most languages and cultures, it is the word ‘sorry’. ‘Sorry’ can be used almost as a verbal tick as people apologise for anything ranging from the mundane to extraordinary, regardless of whether they are truly apologetic or not.

Indeed, recent data from YouGovfound that for every 10 times American research subjects use the word, British research subjects say it 15 times. But where does this obsession with saying ‘Sorry’ stem from?

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88 British expression that can confuse you

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Every language has a few phrases that don’t always translate well — and the British English has some absolute corkers. The team at the Business Insider UK office have compiled a list of the best British slang and idioms that define the weird and wonderful British dialect we grew up with.

Whether you think this list is the «bee’s knees» or if it’s enough to make you want to «pop your clogs,» scroll on to discover 88 very British phrases — in alphabetical order — that will confuse anybody who didn’t grow up in the UK.

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